11 of The Best Ford F-150 Tires

The Best Ford F-150 Tires

It’s the most popular truck in America and has been for over 30 years, so if your original rubber is starting to wear out you’re part of a pretty big group of truck owners asking: What are the best Ford F-150 tires?

As you might expect, there’s no simple answer, so we’ve listed our top pick overall below.

In addition, we’ve decided to offer a selection of different tires depending on what you use your truck for most: ranging from off-road capability, to regular road use, with sub-categories for everything from high-milage tires, to performance tires.

If you’re searching for the best Ford Raptor tires, see our list here.

Types of Tires to Consider

Tire shopping for a pickup can be incredibly hard because not only do you have so many different choices of trim levels and powertrains, but you also have to think about the type of tire that’s right for your style of driving and how you use your truck.

For the vast majority of F-150 buyers the best choice will be conventional all seasons or touring tires. These will deliver the best on-road performance with longer tread life of up around 70,000 miles. They’ll be the quietest too. Don’t expect any off-road grip from them, although a few of the top performers will deliver passable grip.

For those who know they want occasional off-road grip but still spend the majority of their time on-road, a highway terrain tires is likely the best option. These also come with impressively long tread life but offer more off-road traction. Compared to true all-terrain tires they last longer, offer a quieter ride and offer better on-road handling in both the dry and wet (an area some AT tires struggle with).

If regular off-road use is in the cards, then true all-terrain tires are a must. They’ll hold up better over time with regular abuse and while they do have some compromises in terms of on-road noise levels and handling capabilities, with the improvements in tire tech over the last decade or two, you won’t notice much.

Finally, for those looking to have some fun, or who use their truck for extreme work, there are mud-terrain (or maximum traction) tires. While road-legal, these are designed for off-road use. They feature huge knobby tread blocks and plenty of open (void) space between the tread. This allows for excellent grip in mud, dirt, sand and loose earth. Plus, they come with self-cleaning properties. Almost all offer a 3-ply sidewall, which is an extra layer of protection to protect against punctures. Often MT tires are quite expensive.

Top Pick: Best Ford F-150 Tire Overall

Michelin Defender LTX M/S

It’s unusual for us to recommend a tire unless it has a singular stand-out feature. But that’s exactly what we have here. The Michelin Defender LTX M/S isn’t the most comfortable, doesn’t offer the best grip, or provide the longest milage guarantee. So why would we recommend it?

Well, here we have a tire that’s really really good at all of those things, and as a result is more than just the sum of its parts. It’s a top notch performer on the road, with lots of grip in both the dry and wet. It still has some off-road grip if you need it – though don’t expect much. It’s also remarkably quiet, very comfortable and the real world tread life is generally well beyond the warranty of 50,000 to 70,000 miles (depending on the speed rating).

Due to the heavy siping on the tread, wet weather grip is excellent while this tire also offers more winter grip than pretty much any all-season tire on the market. We still recommend a proper set of winter tires, but if you’re not going to do that, then this is the next best thing.

Overall, this is the best well-rounded pick for the majority of F-150 drivers. You may not be a general F-150 driver though, so check out our other recommendations below.

PROS

  • Does all things well
  • Solid tread life
  • Long life
  • Maintains high levels of grip over the course of the tire’s life

CONS

  • Less off-road grip than many other options
  • Premium price

     

Best Ford F-150 Tire Overall (Alternative):

Goodyear Wrangler Fortitude HT

goodyear wrangler fortitude ht review

Now here’s a tire for those looking for a slight edge in off-road capability. The HT in Goodyear Wrangler Fortitude HT stands for Highway Terrain and as such this tire is designed to deliver a combination of the best features of an all-terrain tire and an all-season. Generally speaking HT tires are more of an all-season than an all-terrain and that’s true here – and it can be a good thing if that’s what you’re looking for. There’s definitely more grip than an all-season for those who do semi-regular off-roading or just drive on dirt/gravel roads regularly. It’s still good for every day use and depending on what type you buy the mileage guarantee ranges from 50,000 to 65,000 miles.

PROS

  • Quiet and comfortable
  • Reasonably long life
  • Some off-road capability

CONS

  • Pricey
  • Limited off-road capability

     

Best All-Terrain Tire for Ford F-150:

BFGoodrich All Terrain T/A KO2

Hands-down the best all-terrain tire for the F-150 or pretty much anything else, the BFG All Terrain T/A KO2 has next-level off-road grip. On top of that it comes with an extremely durable construction and offers excellent sidewall protection from punctures, meaning it’s up to the task of hard and repeated off-road use. On road it’s not as dynamic as many in the segment, but that’s not what you’re really paying for here. We should point out that it is rated for true winter use.

Recently BFGoodrich also decided to back the tire with a 50,000 mile tread life warranty. That’s lower than most all-terrain tires, but you can get to that 50k mark even with hard driving.

PROS

  • Incredible off-road grip
  • Amazing durability
  • Winter capable

CONS

  • Definitely expensive
  • Limited on-road grip in the wet compared to most other all-terrain tires
  • Shorter tread life

     

Best All-Terrain Tire for Ford F-150 (Alternative):

Cooper Discoverer AT3 4S

Consider these a more affordable version of the BFG above, with slightly less off-road grip and better on-road manners. While Cooper is by no means a “budget” brand, the BFGs are expensive. The Cooper Discoverer AT3 4S offers excellent off-road traction, though doesn’t have some of the KO2’s more unique features like added sidewall protection. On-road Cooper claims a stopping distance in the wet that’s 10 feet shorter than comparable tires.

We really love the 65,000 mile treadwear warranty!

PROS

  • True off-road grip
  • Civilized on-road
  • Long tread life
  • Winter certified
  • Reasonably priced

CONS

  • Not as extremely capable as some rivals

     

Best Winter Tire for Ford F-150:

Michelin Latitude X-Ice Xi2

https://trucktirereviews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/michelin latitude xice xi2 best ford f-150 winter tire

Michelin is handily one of the top brands overall, and that extends to winter tires like the Latitude X-Ice Xi2. This tire has solid grip in snow, although as the name suggest its really best for grip in cold climates with clear and/or icy roads. It’s quiet for a winter tire and unlike almost every other winter tire on the market, it comes with a tread life warranty – 40,000 miles to be exact. If there’s any drawback, it’ that it’s expensive… but it’s a Michelin, so you probably already knew that.

PROS

  • Impressive grip on snow
  • Stand-out grip on ice

CONS

  • Expensive

     

Best Winter Tire for Ford F-150 (Alternative):

Cooper Evolution Winter

Cooper Evolution Winter Review

As an alternative to the Michelins is this Cooper tire, which is designed for a different type of climate. If you do live somewhere where you regularly get deep snow and lots of it these will provide the grip to pull you into and out of the powder when you need it.

If you’ve got a long driveway, or a road that always seems to get plowed last, these are great. And when the plow has left you a big snowbank that you need to get through, these are fantastic.

PROS

  • Attractive pricing
  • Really impressive grip in deep snow
  • Studdable

CONS

  • Not as much grip on ice as some rivals (like the Michelins above)
  • A bit louder than some premium offerings

     

Best Ford F-150 Tire for Long Life:

Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus

Bridgestone Dueler HL Alenza Plus review

If you want tires for your truck and don’t want to replace them again for a long time, these are the ones for you. Guaranteed to last for 80,000 miles, you’ll get plenty of hassle free years out of the Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus. A solid performing all-season tire, it also delivers everything you might expect from a tier-one tire, from dry and wet grip, to a quiet and comfortable ride.

PROS

  • Extremely long tread life
  • Both comfortable and quiet
  • Solid all-season performance

CONS

  • Driving dynamics not quite up to other premium rivals

     

Best Ford-F-150 Tire for Comfort:

Goodyear Assurance Comfortred Touring

Goodyear Assurance Comfortred Touring

A tire specifically designed for a comfortable ride, Goodyear really delivers if this is the niche you’re going for. They developed these tires with a custom layer of rubber between the tread and steel belts of the tire, something Goodyear says reduces the feeling felt by road impacts by up to 20%. They also come with a 70,00 or 80,000 mile treadwear warranty, so you’ll be driving comfortably for years to come!

PROS

  • Extremely comfortable ride quality
  • Long life
  • Solid all-season performance

CONS

  • Premium price
  • Limited driving dynamics

     

Best Performance Ford F-150 Tire:

BFGoodrich g-Force COMP-2 A/S

BFGoodrich g-Force COMP-2 A/S best all season truck tires

BFG has made a name for itself developing amazing off-road tires for trucks and SUVS – like the All-Terrain T/A KO2 mentioned above. They also make some solid on-road performance tires – even for trucks! The g-Force COMP-2 A/S delivers the best grip you’ll find, with all-season capability, making them perfect for applications with larger aftermarket rims and low profile tire setups. Critically, they also come with a 45,000 mile tread life warranty, something you really won’t find on other performance truck tires.

PROS

  • Impressive driving dynamics and outright grip
  • Solid all-season grip
  • Impressive tread life warranty

CONS

  • Premium price

     

Best Performance Ford F-150 Tire (Alternative):

Kumho Ecsta STX KL12

kumho ecsta stx kl12 best ford f-150 performance tires

As an alternative to the g-Force COMP-2 A/S, these Kumhos deliver great grip in the dry and wet. They’re ideal for more sporty versions of the F-150, such as the Ecoboost V6 and performance V8 trims. There’s no warranty on tire life, but they are quite affordable.

PROS

  • Overall engaging driving dynamics
  • Dry and wet wether grip
  • Attractive pricing

CONS

  • Not quite as much grip as some premium rivals
  • No tread life warranty

     

Best Ford F-150 Tires on a Budget:

General Grabber HTS60

There’s no shortage of cheap tires for the F-150 than you can buy. A lot of them are junk.

Here’s one that definitely isn’t.

General is sub-brand of Continental tires, one of the world leaders in tire technology and manufacturing. It’s best known for making truck tires and does plenty of off-road racing for R&D. Now the Grabber HTS60 isn’t an off-road tire, but it does deliver better off-road capability than you’d expect for an all-season. For what you pay, it offers good grip, a quiet and comfortable ride and we’re really impressed by the 65,000 mile tread life warranty.

If you need some new F-150 tires and don’t want to spend a lot (or don’t have a lot to spend) we highly recommend these!

PROS

  • Budget pricing for an overall quality tire
  • Great tread life
  • Impressive all-season performance

CONS

  • Driving dynamics could be better (but probably not for this price)
  • Tread life could be longer (again, probably not at this price point)

     

Best Ford F-150 Tires on a Budget (Alternative):

Laufenn X-Fit AT

laufenn tires reviews

It’s hard to find fault with these tires for the price. Laufenn is a relatively new tire brand and serves as the budget-focused sub-brand of Hankook. The X-FIT AT offers some solid off-road capability as well as surprisingly good on-road manners with good highway stability and turn-in response. Tread blocks do feature stone ejector ledges to prevent gravel from getting trapped in the tread, limiting grip and reducing tire life.

There’s also plenty of siping to give it good traction on-road in the wet, something most AT tires lack. The tread life warranty is a bit short at just 45,000 miles, but for a price that’s at least 25% less than many tires on this list, it’s a fantastic choice.

PROS

  • All-terrain grip at a budget price
  • Reasonably refined on-road driving performance

CONS

  • Less capable off-road than most all-terrain tires
  • Short 45,000 mile tread life

     

Best Mud-Terrain Tire for Ford F-150

BFGoodrich Mud-Terrain TA KM3

With BFG’s TA KO2 being a top pick for all-terrain tires it should come as little surprise that those looking for the next-level of off-road grip should opt for the incredible Mud Terrain TA KM3.

This tire offers extreme traction in all circumstances, from mud to rock crawling. It’s also amazingly durable.

It has plenty of voice space, stone ejector ribs and a sidewall with plenty of extra rubber for added grip (and protection). Beyond all this, BFG’s unique tread compound is just fantastically durable. The slits cut into the internal tread blocks actually function to grab onto rocks when aired down, giving even more grip than you’ll find elsewhere.

The tread casing also makes use of the brand’s CoreGuard Max Technology, which it tested on its KR3 race truck tire and allowed BFG to win the Baja Championship.

PROS

  • The ultimate in off-road grip
  • Next-level durability
  • A mud-terrain tire that’s amazing on rocks

CONS

  • Expensive
  • Very expensive

     

Best Budget Mud-Terrain Tire for Ford F-150

General Grabber X3

Having serious fun off-road doesn’t have to cost a fortune. The Grabber X3 from General Tire offers a simple yet effective take on the mud-terrain tire.

Huge tread lugs with plenty of void space allows them to dig in to loose surfaces and mud. Rock crawling is also an area they excel at thanks to the angular design of the tread blocks and the divots cut into the center lugs.

In addition, stone ejectors line the spaces between the shoulder tread lugs to clear out rocks or mud that become stuck in the tread.

And to help protect the tire a 3-ply sidewall is used (as expected) while the tread also wraps round the sidewall as an added layer of protection.

These tires split the different between the more extreme and expensive versions on the market, and the discount brands that offer just the basics and wear out too fast.

PROS

  • Quality MT tire with great off-road grip in soft earth or hard rocks
  • All the usual items from a 3-ply sidewall to a stone ejectors
  • Love the look with the red-lettering

CONS

  • Cool red-lettering can wear off
  • Not as much grip as tier-1 offerings

   

What Tires Come on the F-150

Below is a list of the tires sizes for each trim of F-150. This should help you choose the right tires for your truck.

King Ranch 2-wheel drive
275/55R20
King Ranch 2-wheel drive
265/60R18
King Ranch 4-wheel drive
275/55R20
King Ranch 4-wheel drive
275/65R18
King Ranch 4-wheel drive with Heavy Duty Pay Load Package
LT275/65R18/C
Lariat 2-wheel drive
275/55R20
Lariat 2-wheel drive
265/60R18
Lariat 4-wheel drive
275/55R20
Lariat 4-wheel drive
275/65R18
Lariat with Heavy Duty Pay Load Package
LT275/65R18/C
Limited
P275/45R22
Platinum
275/55R20
Raptor
LT315/70R17/C
XL 2-wheel drive
275/55R20
XL 2-wheel drive
245/70R17
XL 4-wheel drive
275/55R20
XL 4-wheel drive
265/70R17
XL with Heavy Duty Pay Load Package
LT275/65R18/C
XL with Heavy Duty Pay Load Package
LT245/70R17/E
XLT 2-wheel drive
265/60R18
XLT 2-wheel drive
275/55R20
XLT 2-wheel drive
245/70R17
XLT 4-wheel drive
275/65R18
XLT 4-wheel drive
275/55R20
XLT 4-wheel drive
265/70R17
XLT with Heavy Duty Pay Load Package
LT275/65R18/C
XLT with Heavy Duty Pay Load Package
LT245/70R17/

What Brand of Tire does Ford Use on the F-150?

Many versions of the F-150 come equipped with the Michelin Primacy XC, an all-season tire with a 55,000 mile tread life warranty. Others come with the Pirelli Scorpion ATR, an all-terrain tire that’s more expensive but designed for some off-road use. As afar as all-terrain tires go, however, it’s more focused on on-road traction and isn’t as capable as many rival tires. It is more well-rounded though, hence by Ford would offer it from the factory. It comes with a 50,000 mile warranty.

How Long Do F-150 Tires Last?

The length of the tire life on an F-150 depends of course on what type of driving you do, your driving habits and if you regularly rotate your tires and keep them properly maintained. It also depends on what tires you have. Here are four popular OE fitment tires that come on the F-150 from the factory.

The Hankook Dynapro AT2. These tires are expected to last around 60,000 miles and most owners report a lifespan right around that number.

The Hankook Dynapro AT-M. These tires have an estimated life expectancy of 50,000 miles.

The Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure with Kevlar. These tires are expected to last 60,000 miles.

The Michelin LTX MS2. These tires are expected to last 70,000 miles and many owners report as many as 100,000 miles on a set.

How Much do Ford F-150 Tires Cost?

Pricing ranges widely for F-150 tires depending on the type and size. A set of 18 or 20-inch all-season or highway terrain tires from a quality brand cost approximately $190 to 220 per tire, while an all-terrain tire costs in the range of $220 to $260.

Will All-Terrain Tires Affect The Ride Quality of My F-150?

The short answer is: it depends. The long answer…. is also it depends. It just comes with a real explanation. For starters, many F-150 models come from the factory with all-terrain tires, so you’re likely to retain much of the same ride quality. We will add that AT tires vary in off-road performance pretty significantly, and the more aggressive they are off-road the louder they tend to be on-road – with less grip too.

So as a general gauge, the more off-road grip you want, the more you’ll compromise in terms of ride quality. And to clarify, by ride quality we mean noice levels. All-terrain tires tend to be pretty comfortable overall and offer a reasonably plush ride.

An option that finds a nice compromise between all-season and all-terrain tires is the highway terrain category. These offer some off-road grip, but are more designed for off-road comfort – and longer tread life. And as a general rule, highway terrain tires from European brands like Continental, Pirelli or Michelin tend to be even more on-road focused.

Tire Buying FAQ

When should you replace tires?

The are three critical factors when it comes to replacing the tires on your F-150, or any other vehicle for that matter: mileage, age and the amount of remaining tread.

Tire Age

Tires have an age limit and it’s in the five to six year range. If the tires on your vehicle are seven years old or older, you definitely need to replace them no matter how much tread you have left or how few miles you’ve driven. It’s important to remember that tires aren’t just a combination of rubber wrapped around steel belts, they are made up of complex chemicals that break down over time.

Conveniently, you don’t have to dig though credit card receipts to find out when you bought your tires – it’s printed right on the sidewall. Sort of. The DOT code on the side of the tire is made up of 12 digits in four digit groups. The final grouping of numbers is the date info: the first two numbers represent the week the tire was manufactures and the second two digits tell you what year it was made.

To give an example, if the date is 5219, then the tires were made in the last week of 2019.

Mileage

Most tires come with a recommended tire life. It’s often referred to as a warranty, but it’s not really a warranty. There are thousands of reasons you might not see as many miles as the manufacturer suggest.

If you’re like the majority of drivers, you probably put between 12,000 and 15,000 miles on your vehicle (and your tires) every year. So if a set of tires is designed to achieve 60,000 miles then you’ll likely get between four and five years out of them.

How brands get to that recommended life is displayed in the UTQG (Uniform Tire Quality Grade) rating, also found on the sidewall. It includes a three digit number, followed by a series of two (or more) letters. The number is perhaps the most important element here. To determine the number, manufacturers run the tire on a test track for 11,520 kilometers, stopping to measure the tread depth every 1,280 km. They then compare this against a control, and the higher the three digit number is, the longer the tread life. So an ultra high performance summer tire might have a 280 rating whereas a touring all-season might be rated as high as 800. Sometimes this number is used to describe the “hardness” of the rubber, though that’s not technically accurate.

So we don’t leave anything out, the first letter (or letters) in the sequence specifies the Traction rating of the tire, indicating how well it stops in the wet with a grade of AA, A, B or C. The second letter in the sequence is the Temperature rating, indicating how well it holds up to extreme heat, with a rating of A, B or C.

It’s important to note here, that as far as the UTQG rating is concerned, these numbers are not standardized and vary between brands. As a result, it’s ok to compare UTQG ratings within a brand, but not one brand to another.

Tread

Finally, you’ll know its time to replace your tires when the tread depth has reached 2/32 of an inch in depth.

You may have heard something about using a penny to measure this, and while it sounds like a made up backyard mechanic trick, it’s quite accurate. Take a penny, Lincoln facing you, and turn it upside down. Place it in the tread. If you can clearly see all of Lincoln’s head, it’s time to replace your tires. And soon!

Or, you can just buy a tread depth gauge.

Where can I find the best price on tires?

There is no one answer to this question unfortunately. Sites like Tire Rack and Discount tire offer deals all the time on specific brands. You can also find deals on Amazon though they are much harder to find and often only apply to a specific size or group of sizes. Visit our Tire Deals page for more info.

When is the best time to buy tires?

It’s common that many shoppers buy tires once its already too late. At that point you don’t have a lot of choice and can often over-pay. If you’re planning ahead, generally, retailers offer significant tire deals around major holiday weekends (especially in the summer), as well as Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

How much is Shipping?

Shipping is often included when you purchase tires online. Many retailers offer free shipping if you get your tires shipped to an installer that they recommend. Even if you ship to your home, Tire Rack offers free shipping on purchases over $50. And if you’re buying new tires, that won’t be hard.

How long does shipping take?

Shipping can take just a few days, or over a week in the worst cases. Often it depends on where you live. anyone in a larger urban center or living closer to a tire distribution center can get them quite quickly.

Does anyone offer mobile tire installation?

Depending on where you live, there may be numerous local mobile tire installers available. If you don’t want to deal with the hassle of tracking one down, TireRack offers its own service. You don’t even have to purchase tires from TireRack to use it.

While it’s more expensive than bringing your tires to the shop, it’s also a lot more convenient. Prices start at $25 per tire.

How much does it cost to install a tire?

Generally you’ll pay between $25 and $50 per tire for installation services. This includes mounting and balancing, while using the latest tools so your rims don’t get scuffed or scraped.

Do I need to replace the tire pressure monitoring system when I change tires?

It’s not necessary to replace TMPS sensors when you change tires, but you may want to consider it. The units can fail over time due to damage or corrosion. Also, most units contain a battery and as a sealed unit, they must be replaced when the battery wears down. While most tire installers will handle sourcing these parts for you, you can also buy your own here.

Do online tire retailers offer rebates?

Absolutely! In fact, rebates are offered by most brands (even premium ones). Often these incentives are offered with other deals including up-front discounts and credit card offers.

3 thoughts on “11 of The Best Ford F-150 Tires”

  1. F150 Platinum w/ OE Hankook Dynapro AT 275/55-20″. 90% Hwy Texas & regional travel driving / 10% Upper Midwest in dicey winter travel. Welcome thoughts on quality replacement w/in 2 months. Ruling out current OE Hankook due to some iffy handling on hwy and some noise . I would go w/ Michelin in a heartbeat for the hwy part but have to weigh the winter travel routine part now as of last year. Appreciate your thoughts. TIA guys.

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